Iconic Photos

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Needle Park | Bill Eppridge

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Tributes last week remembered him as the photographer who took the last photos of Robert F. Kennedy as the senator lay dying on the floor of a Californian hotel. But Bill Eppridge, who died on October 3rd, was a photographic icon long before that fateful night in 1968. Throughout the 60s, Eppridge documented for Life magazine the fast-changing America — he was there when the Beatles first came to New York; he photographed Barbara Streisand washing her clothes in a tub; he saw an emotional fraught funeral for a Civil Rights leader murdered by the Klan.

But for this author at least his most powerful work was the photoessay on heroin addicts in New York City which appeared in Life magazine in February 1965. Eppridge and James Mills, associate editor at Life who wrote the accompanying article, spent months trailing and living with two addicts who described themselves as “animals in a world no one knows.” That touching photo essay, gritty and raw well before the words became overused in photographic context, won the 1964 Headliner Award. That story later inspired the motion picture, ‘Panic in Needle Park’ starring Al Pacino and Kitty Winn as John and Karen, “two lives lost to heroin,” in LIFE’s powerful words.  [Further photos on Life website].

THE DRUG-TAKERS

Here is Eppridge, remembering the assignment:

The writer, Jim Mills, and I started doing research on the heroin culture that had crossed over from subcultures and was quite seriously affecting the white middle classes. We spent three months learning everything we could about it. It took us that long to find a couple, after contacting every agency we could. When we found them, we had to persuade them to do it for free; we couldn’t have paid them – it would just support their habit. I went and lived with them for three months, and tried to be invisible. I’ve been skinny and gaunt all my life, so I fitted in with that society. It got to the point when they just ignored me and didn’t care whether I was there or not. As a matter of fact, I got stopped by the cops more than they did. They wanted to know where I got the cameras.

Often we would lead a story with a question rather than a statement. There is a statement here, but it asks a question… ‘We are animals in a world no one knows’: What is the world? How are the people like animals, they look like a normal couple, crossing the street? It brings the reader in. In the next spread you see who they are: heroin addicts. We did not show the needle very often; we had to be aware of our readership, so we didn’t want to show a lot of gore.

Karen came from a very fine family, on Long Island, but to make money to support her habit, she wasa prostitute. She was a beautiful woman. The police referred to her as the actress. She could change her looks at a whim, but when she did too many drugs, she started to look bad. John came from a very fine family in New Jersey, but to make money, he stole, boosted from cabs – he was a petty thief. Karen found that she couldn’t support her habit anymore, so she checked herself into a hospital, and was able to cut back to a habit that was affordable. I don’t think that’s possible today. I went in with them and photographed things as they happened. None of this was ever set up, I just lived with them and I waited until things happened.

They were on the street looking for a dealer; I looked over their shoulder and there was a gentleman standing there who looked like he didn’t belong. It was a cop, an undercover narc. He and his buddy came along, they spotted Karen and John were addicts, and they proceeded to search them. John was put in jail. I went to the judge and asked if we could photograph him in jail. I don’t know if it’s possible to have that access today. So, John’s in jail and Karen’s got to go and get drugs. She goes to see a dealer.

I was sitting in the lobby of the hotel, waiting for her to come down, and I got a phone call. It was Karen, she said, “You’d better come up here, we got a problem”. Her dealer had overdosed. The guy could have died. It was a big dilemma; should I call the police or should I photograph it? I asked Karen how she felt about it and she said she could bring him round. So I took her word for it and didn’t call 911. And she brought him around. I constantly faced situations that bordered on illegal. It was hard having to make these kinds of decisions, but I think I made the right ones most of the time.

One of the things we highlighted was that this was not a physical addiction as much as a psychological problem. We also said that it was difficult, if not perhaps impossible, to totally deal with this problem. Those addicts still exist in one form or another.

Written by Alex Selwyn-Holmes

October 10, 2013 at 6:46 am

7 Responses

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  1. Whew… Harrowing, yet he still manged to get some well-composed emotional images despite the difficult circumstances I saw THE PANIC IN NEEDLE PARK a few years ago on DVD, and thought it was an amazing film. Seeing these images I realize it was even more truthful than I imagined. It’s defi8nitely worthwhile to see the additional images on you LIFE Magazine link

    martaze

    October 10, 2013 at 12:27 pm

  2. I remember this when it first came out. It was fantastic. Still holds power to this day. I saw beautiful normal looking European women in situations like that during the war, but I had not seen it here in the U.S., up close and personal…It was riveting and I can remember sitting in the old red leather chair with the house quiet like Monte Casino (the hour before we leveled it) and turning the pages slowly, actually frightened of what I would see next. For me, that was a real rare experience, especially since I prided myself as “Having seen everything”.

    Your Obt. Svt.
    Col Korn,
    Chief O’ Mayhem in the Great WW-2 (And the Cold War)
    Now Chief O’ Security, Sanitation (And the Complaint Dept.)
    OXOjamm Studios.

    Col. Korn

    October 10, 2013 at 2:36 pm

  3. Reblogueó esto en Formas de representar.

    emilioamella

    October 13, 2013 at 11:35 pm

  4. Amazing story and photos. Definitely the work of a pioneer.

    I just stumbled upon your blog and I can see I`m gonna stay.

    Reposted in The Underestimator:

    http://theunderestimator.tumblr.com/post/64106315166/bill-eppridge-s-portraits-of-a-heroin-addicted-couple

    The Underestimator

    October 15, 2013 at 11:03 am

  5. This kind of real-life photography, becoming one with the photography subject, has always intrigued me. That was also the method Bruce Davidson followed, in order to capture the everyday life of a true Brooklyn gang, the Jokers, back in the fifties.

    He stayed with the Jokers for several months and the boundary between detached observation and immersion in the subject matter became blurred.

    If this kind of story intrigues you as well, check out the relevant post “Forever Young: A Brooklyn Gang Photographed By Bruce Davidson In 1959″ on Round Up The Usual Suspects and, who knows, it may prove to be an interesting story for a furure post on Iconic Photos…:

    http://rounduptheusualsuspects.blogspot.gr/2013/06/forever-young-brooklyn-gang.html

    GUS

    October 15, 2013 at 3:58 pm

  6. […] more: Bill Eppridge, the great Life photographer best remembered for his photos of slain RFK and of New York drug addicts; Wayne F. Miller, who covered bombed-out Japan and black America; Hector Oaxaca Acosta, the great […]


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