McMinnville UFO

McMinnville, Oregon. 7:30 pm. May 11, 1950. Evelyn Trent was walking back to her farmhouse after feeding rabbits on her farm while she saw an unidentified flying object in the sky. She called out to her husband, Paul, who took the above picture. At the urging of a friend, they later submitted the photo to the local newspaper the Telephone-Register, which put it on the front page on June 9th. The Oregonian published the photographs the next day, and within a month they were published in LIFE magazine (June 26 1950).

LIFE subsequently misplaced the negatives and they were through to be lost for 17 years. Since its rediscovery, the photograph had since been subjected to intense scrutiny involving computer analysis and sophisticated scanning and stretching procedures. The Trents’ background was also thoroughly checked. Some thought they hanged an object from the power lines. Some measured the shadows and assumed it was ‘staged’ in the morning time. Others insist the Trents’ original resistance to publish the photo was a testament to their honesty. It has never been satisfactorily explained, and some believe it is the best (if not only) authentic UFO photograph. The affair led to a “UFO Festival” being held in McMinnville each year, which is the biggest such gathering apart from Roswell, New Mexico’s.

Eric Gairy and UFOs

SIR ERIC GAIRY A L'ONU LE 7 OCTOBRE 1977 GIF

un-ufo

He was tall, handsome and well-dressed. A working class hero, Sir Eric Gairy was fondly remembered for his legendary political career (“Gairyism”) in Grenada, but outside his insular nation, he was better known for his obsession with UFOs. (Gairy who spent much of his tiny country’s resources investigating the reason why Grenada was a favorite landing point for flying saucers).

De facto ruler of Grenada since 1950, he led his nation to Independence from Britain in 1974; however his erratic administration provoked a group led by British-trained lawyer Maurice Bishop called the New Jewel Movement (NJM) to lead demonstrations against him. Gairy responded to the NJM by summoning his paramilitary unit, the “Mongoose Gang” to apply strong-armed methods often compared to Duvalier of Haiti’s “Ton-Ton Macoute”.

Gairy was convinced that mankind was threatened by extra-terrestrials arriving in flying saucers. He repeatedly called for a special group within the UN to investigate UFOs. The fact that the then-UN secretary general was a fellow UFO enthusiast Kurt Waldheim facilitated his proposal. In 1979, in Miami an ad hoc conference of UFO experts under the UN auspices was held. Attending were Gairy, Waldheim, and a trio of high profile ufologists who actively supported Gairy:  Hungarian military scientist Col. von Keviczk; American astronomer Dr. Josef Allen Hynek and French computer scientist Jacques Vallee.

The above photo was taken at the Miami Conference. From left to right: American astronaut Gordon Cooper, Vallee, French space scientist Claude Poher, Hynek, Gairy seat to the right of Sec. Gen. Waldheim. It was at this meeting that a bloodless coup by the NJM put Maurice Bishop in power in Grenada and ousted Gairy. With the ouster of Gairy, the UFO talks stopped. After the coup Gairy remained in the United States, returning in 1984, a few months after the Bishop regime self-destructed. His party never won another election and he himself was defeated at the polls. He became Sir Gairy in 1976 and was affectionately known as “uncle” by the people of Grenada.